Bachelor of
Screen Production
   COURSE SUMMARY
   Qualification / Award Bachelor of Screen Production
   Course Duration 2 years full-time (6 trimesters)
   Credit Points 144 credit points
   Delivery On Campus at Macquarie Park and at Waterloo
   Available to Domestic (FEE-HELP available)/International
   ATAR N/A
   IELTS 6.0 with no band less than 6.0
   CRICOS Code 0101531
   Financial Information Course Fees Page
   AQF Level 7
   Key Dates Application Deadlines and other Key Course Dates

INTERNATIONAL AWARD-WINNING LECTURERS

FIRST CLASS INDUSTRY FACILITIES & EQUIPMENT

RICH & MEANINGFUL FILMMAKING

THE CREATIVE TRIAD

Excelsia College is proud to be partnering with one of the world’s top film schools, Sydney Film School, to deliver Australia’s newest film degree the Bachelor of Screen Production. The degree offers a unique model of training inspiring students to create rich and meaningful filmmaking with International Award-Winning Lecturers and Mentors.

The program is delivered by Sydney Film School and Excelsia College at the two campuses, with the program accredited and qualifications provided by Excelsia College.

COURSE DELIVERY


The Bachelor of Screen Production is 2 years full-time (6 trimesters). It is a third-party arrangement between Excelsia College and Sydney Film School. The course will be taught by Excelsia staff (of whom many are also SFS lecturers) and is subject to Excelsia’s policies and procedures.

The course is taught at both the Sydney Film School Waterloo campus (two days) and Excelsia’s Macquarie Park campus (one day) , which means that students will need to travel between these campuses during the duration of the course. Students won’t normally be required to travel between the two campuses on a given day. Travel time is approx 25mins by car and one hour by public transport.

An Excelsia Course Manager will be available at the Sydney Film School Waterloo campus to provide support to students.

Third party arrangement between Excelsia College and Sydney Film School
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Bachelor of Screen Production

Screen & Film Courses at Excelsia College

Students will create original work at SFS’s world leading facilities in Waterloo while enjoying the specialize production design spaces and well equipped classrooms at Excelsia’s Macquarie Park campus.

These state-of-the-art facilities include a world class sound stage, cinema, movement studios, training rooms, production offices, postproduction mastering suite, editing suites, animation pods with industry ready cameras and equipment.

Students undertaking the degree learn on set production skills ranging from and specialising in:

• Cinematography
• Directing
• Editing
• Design (set, props, etc)
• Screenwriting
• Production coordination
• Sound Production

To develop excellence in the art, craft and technology of production, we believe students crucially need critical thinking skills to analyse and evaluate current industry practices and strategically explore new modes of storytelling. Though the degree specialises students for work in the film industry, upon graduation students will have acquired entrepreneurial skills and abilities to transfer knowledge to other platforms e.g. online content, Vlogging etc.

See Sydney Film School Facilities here: Virtual Studio Tour

Green Screen
Bachelor of Screen Production

Across the degree, students participate in four production projects:

• short film
• documentary
• minor screen production
• major screen production

Two of these production projects (short film and major screen production) are managed across two trimesters (a development and pre-production phase, and a production and post-production phase) to ensure in-depth skill development of each phase of screen production. Practical on-set exercises to develop students’ understanding of:

• On-set protocol and logistics
• Film terminology and on-set jargon
• Theoretical studies into the pre-production and production chain of command
• Personnel and processes

Students are organised into working short film crews to practice on set exercises and develop the necessary creative and organisational documentation to launch into filming. In the major screen production students are required to undertake a major role in a screen production of their choosing. Screen productions can include short films, web-series pilots etc. and major roles include directing, production management, cinematography, production design, and post.

Creative Art Bachelor Of Screen Production

The Bachelor of Screen Production is the only degree in NSW to offer a creative hub of specialist students from complementing degrees (Music, Drama & Screen Production) who can write, create, act, perform and produce all elements of film making in-house. Screen Productions students have access and collaborate with a network of future:

• Film composers
• Actors
• Set designers
• Screenwriters
• Creative influencers, entrepreneurs and more…

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  • NSW Higher School Certificate or its interstate or overseas equivalent

OR:

  • Attainment of tertiary qualification, or satisfactory completion of at least one year’s full-time load in a tertiary course

All prospective students applying to the Bachelor of Screen Production undertake two exciting and important stages:

  1. Online Application & Portfolio:
    The online application consists of student information, qualifications, and experience as well as the submission of a portfolio*. Applicants should present one or more short examples in their portfolio that demonstrate their creative work in their chosen interest with a one page written rationale.
    *See details below.
  2. Interview:
    Following the review of an application and portfolio, successful applicants will be invited to discuss their special areas of interest in film/video, any related experience they may have, and why they wish to do the course. International applicants will need to fill a supplementary form and if needed will be required to attend an interview.
    *Sydney Film School students see variance below for interview stage

For a portfolio submission please include one of the following, together with a one page rationale and an indication of what role you have contributed to the work you submit. We are looking for evidence of creative initiative, effective planning, and coherent storytelling through image and/or sound.

If you are unsure of your area or have multiple interests, choose one. Each video submission is to be a short 1-3-minute showreel with the instruction below:

   
Cinematography
Short showreel of camerawork you have done.
or
A narrative PowerPoint sequence of still images that you have shot (up to 15 images, ppt. file) (fictional or documentary).
   
   
Directing
Short showreel of one or more filmed narrative sequences you have directed.
(fictional or documentary)
   

 

 

Screen Editing
Short showreel of one or more filmed narrative sequences you have edited.
(fictional or documentary)

 

 
   
Design Design
Short showreel of one or more filmed narrative sequences you have contributed design – set, props, costume, etc.
or
a storyboard PowerPoint sequence (fictional or documentary) that would be of 1-3 minutes duration onscreen
   

 

 

Sound Postproduction
Short showreel of one or more filmed narrative sequences you have created sound design for.
or
Submit a short soundscape recording (1-3 minutes, mp3 file) that demonstrates some form of narrative. (fictional or documentary)

 

 

 

 

Co-ordination

Production Co-ordination
Short showreel of one or more productions you’ve managed.
(fictional or documentary)

 

 

 

 

Writing
Short showreel of productions of one or more narrative sequences you have written
or
Submit a sample script, formatted for film or TV (1-3 minutes onscreen duration, PDF format)

 

 

Students who have completed the diploma or advanced diploma with Sydney Film School are encouraged and invited to apply for articulation to the Bachelor of Screen Production.

Please contact one of our Student Advisors for further information.

Overseas students applying for admission to Excelsia College courses must have reached the age of 18 years by the commencement of their studies.  Excelsia College will not admit overseas students who have not yet reached 18 years of age.

English Language Proficiency 

Candidates whose qualifying studies were completed in a language other than English will normally be required to demonstrate English proficiency equivalent to the overall minimum score of 6.0 (no band less than 6) in the IELTS academic test.

For test score equivalencies for alternative tests visit: excelsia.edu.au/international/entry-into-australia/

For more information visit the International Student page.

Applicants who do not have a NSW Higher School Certificate (or equivalent) or completed their secondary education more than two years ago and have not undertaking or completed vocational education training (VET) or higher education study since then can apply for admission using work and life experience.

“Experience” could include a combination of factors which demonstrate readiness for higher education. Includes mature age entry, professional experience whether completion of the Special Tertiary Admission Test (STAT) is required or not, community involvement or work experience.

Please visit the Applicants with Work and Life Experience information page.

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If you’ve dreamed of entering the Film/TV industry, of making your own unique film projects, of one day sharing your own artistic voice, this is the course for you.

The Bachelor of Screen Production has been designed to teach, equip and train students to be industry ready and networked once graduated. Potential future roles include (and not limited to):

Director
Cinematographer
Editor
Production Management
Production Designer
Screenwriter
Sound Recordist
and active generators of creative screen work

What if you're already in the industry?
Potential students already working in the industry may want to refine their skills and become active generators of creative work and build upon their existing network. By becoming qualified in the Bachelor of Screen Production you open the door to further opportunities at a higher level.


Course Learning Outcome:
Students graduating will be able to enter the film industry with confidence and seek employment in a wide range of roles as well as specialist opportunities. Graduates will be able to:

1. Frame, theorise and contextualise screen production as a coherent field of knowledge.
2. Communicate original interpretations and creative visions to a range of audiences.
3. Use current and emerging techniques and technologies to actualise the initiation, production and dissemination of screen outputs and screen-related knowledge and skills which meet industry standards.
4. Critically evaluate and participate in a broad range of screen production projects drawing upon independent and collaborative approaches and requiring cognitive and creative skills.
5. Engage in professional practice which is reflective of personal responsibility, accountability and an ethical approach to screen production.

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Students are expected to achieve a high standard in production through a range of diverse and increasingly complex screen projects, culminating in an individually initiated major thesis screen production.

The course produces skilled and informed screen production entry-level professionals with diverse capacities, ranging from freelance production managers, screenwriters, directors, and technical practitioners such as cinematographers, sound recordists and editors.

The Bachelor of Screen Production combines the teaching of theoretical and creative processes with practical hands-on screen production, recognising that rapid technological innovations and divergent social engagement necessitate the skills to adapt to new modes of creative expression.


YEAR SNAPSHOTS

First Year:  Students build competence in a range of production skills complemented by progressively more challenging and divergent production projects. This is supported by reflections on how they want to impact society as professional creatives.

Second Year: Students specialise in one production discipline learning advanced skills in their chosen area as well as designing a creative career to successfully enter the film industry. Students deepen their awareness of how technology and social values have shifted and been shaped by changes in different expressions of screen communication.

course units

This unit introduces students to the theoretical and practical skills required to complete development and the pre-production stages of filming for a short film project. Practical on-set exercises to develop students’ understanding of on-set protocol and logistics are combined with theoretical studies into the pre-production and production chain of command, personnel and processes. Students are organised into working short film crews to practice on set exercises and develop the necessary creative and organisational documentation to launch into filming in trimester 2.

Students are introduced to a specialised role in Screen Production and acquire technical and theoretical skills required to perform that role in the corresponding Production I-VI unit. Specialisations in this first workshop could include producing, 1st assistant directing, 16mm film, costume/set design, sound recording, production management, continuity/script supervision and need to be decided in consultation with the lecturer and Course Manager. Students learn these skills in small group weekly hour-long sessions with a mentor from their specialisation, culminating in the production of exercises related to their specialisation.

Students will be provided with conceptual and practical tools to develop and realise the visual approach of a screen project. They will be introduced to fundamental concepts of production design including the role and responsibilities of the production designer, the collaborative process and the physical elements of a production’s design. Script analysis for design is explored; analysing story, characters, themes, narrative structure and stylistic elements.

This unit introduces cinematography theory and industry standard practices to enable students to undertake the role of cinematographer and other roles within the camera and lighting departments. Students are required to demonstrate a foundational technical knowledge of cinematography and articulate an understanding of the creative aspects that will inform a cinematographer’s approach to screen production, including collaboration with other key creative departments.

This unit introduces students to the specific functions of the screen director through a foundation in the theory of screen direction and its application in scenes.  The unit includes a historical overview of screen performance and a series of practical workshops that scaffold students through scene breakdowns, casting actors, conducting rehearsals, defining blocking and devising coverage, including storyboarding and shot lists. Students also learn to analyse and approach a text from a directorial point of view.

This unit introduces students to the foundations of screen storytelling.  The unit provides an overview of storytelling through image, sound, design, direction, editing and performance. Students will learn to analyse and evaluate screen ‘works’ in regard to the various creative contributions (direction, scripting, cinematography, design, performance, sound, and editing). This foundational unit provides a common, shared language for analysis and evaluation of screen excerpts that students will encounter in the various discipline-specific units they will study elsewhere in Bachelor of Screen Production course.

This unit continues students’ understanding of the theoretical and practical skills involved in producing short films with the introduction to the production and post production phases of the screen production cycle. The unit examines the production phase in its actualisation and flexibility around all that was envisaged and planned in the pre production period. Similarly, the post production phase is analysed in regard of both the development of editing skills and the stage of reflection where students can evaluate their personal development and areas for improvement. Students are kept in the same crews from trimester 1 to work on the post production exercises, complete their short films and participate in a debriefing phase for their films.

This unit introduces students to the concepts, structures, aesthetics, techniques and technologies involved in digital post production. Student learning has a particular emphasis in the editing process, with a general overview of sound, graphics, and colour grading. Non-linear editing techniques and approaches are demonstrated, discussed and applied by students with regard to both technical and aesthetic perspectives. Students will analyse effective storytelling as it is achieved through the craft of editing and through an appreciation of various editing theories and post production processes They will also develop media workflow and project management skills, evaluate appropriate media exchange processes, and identify the personal skills required to edit footage for a variety of screen production projects.

The aim of this Unit is to equip students with a conceptual understanding and technical foundations in the use of audio post production techniques and sound design for screen production. Students will be instructed in the use and application of the digital audio workstation Pro Tools as it is considered to be the industry standard. Students will construct and edit audio in screen productions and analyse the importance of sound in relation to moving image.

This unit introduces students to a range of tools, concepts and ideas that will enable them to examine both their own particular worldview and that of others. It challenges students to engage critically with philosophy, popular culture, religion and their own art to begin to examine what they think about the world and why. Students are challenged both as consumers and producers of content to evaluate the subconscious worldview assumptions and didactic intent of the cultural products they engage with.

This unit introduces students to the creative and practical considerations of creating documentaries in the modern world. Students are encouraged to examine about the breadth of the documentary genre and its creative practice as well as its role in news, journalism and the media.

This unit is the second in the sequence of three units where students focus on a specialised screen production role. In this unit students further develop the technical and theoretical skills required to perform that specific role in the corresponding Production I-VI unit. Students learn these skills in weekly one hour one-to-one sessions across the trimester, culminating in the performance of a role in a production and a creative task pertaining to their specialization. Specializations could include 1st assistant directing, cinematography, sound recording, production design, production management, post production sound, editing, continuity, directing and producing, and need to be decided in consultation with the lecturer and Head of School.

The purpose of this unit is to introduce students to the processes of screen writing including finding inspiration for concepts and formulating ideas into a dramatic and visual form. Students will analyse short film genres by applying structural techniques and industry standard writing formats to produce a final draft short film screenplay. They will learn to identify character point of view and start analysis between outer and inner journeys of their characters. They will draw focus on a lyrical moment in their film to bring emotion to their character’s major turning points.  They will critique their work through script editing processes and exercises to explore how characters form the basis of stories through a cinematic format.

This unit provides students with the theoretical framework and analytical skills to appreciate the interplay between technological, social, political, economic, cultural and aesthetic trends that have shaped the various histories of film, television and online screen production in the West.  Students are encouraged to explore specific periods where technological innovation and/or cultural change generate new stories and new audiences and to understand that the patterns of the past continue to impact present and future modes of storytelling on screen. While the focus in the early decades of the 20th century will focus on American and European cinema (due to their significance in the shaping of contemporary Western screen storytelling) recognition will also be made of the effects of exposure to screen stories from the Pasifika region in more recent decades.

This unit offers students the opportunity to produce and direct their own thesis film. Students will learn build on their existing knowledge of filmmaking to create a screen product, from initial concept, to pitching, filming and post production. Student are encouraged to reflect on the creative process, examine where their work fits in the overall body of modern screen content and devise work that reflects both their creative and career ambitions.

This unit is the third in the sequence of three units where students focus on a specialised screen production role. In this unit students further develop the technical and theoretical skills required to perform that specific role in the corresponding Production I-VI unit. Students learn these skills in small group weekly one hour sessions across the trimester, culminating in the performance of this role in Production IV (Minor Screen Production) and a creative task pertaining to their specialisation. Specialisations could include 1st assistant directing, cinematography, sound recording, production design, production management, post production sound, editing, continuity, directing and producing, and need to be decided in consultation with the lecturer and Course Manager.

This unit provides students with the theoretical framework and analytical skills to engage with a wide variety of screen (film and TV) genres that have endured and evolved over time. Students are encouraged to identify the particular screen story-telling techniques and consequent feeling states that are used to both assure and unsettle audience expectations. The unit also offers practical opportunities for students to test out how genre conventions might work in a screen trailer that they devise. Screen genres are a tool of the storyteller to both satisfy and create unanticipated desire in the experience of the audience.

This unit focuses on the everyday and creative lives of students undertaking the unit. The interrelationship of work, play and creativity will be examined to allow students to begin to deduce their practical place in the world both as artists and humans. Particular consideration will be given to topics such as global citizenship, the philosophy of artistic creation, ethical creative practice and sustainable artistic habits.

In this Unit students learn how to frame and develop creative concepts, project support and human and financial resourcing required for a substantial screen production. Students fulfil a key creative role (direction, cinematography, sound (production and post), production management, production design, or editing) in one or more Major screen productions. Students select their key production role in consultation with both the Lecturer and Head of School. Screen productions may include short films, web-series pilots etc. This Unit enables students to analyse, evaluate and apply themselves to the most appropriate production format for their particular vision and future career aspirations. This unit overlaps into Production VI as each student progresses from pre production to production to post production of their major screen projects.

This unit supports students in a specialty support role on another student’s major screen production in Production V/Production VI. Students further develop skills pertaining to another field of specialization and develop the ability to analyse their work in the context of another student’s vision. Students also learn fundamentals of upwards management and how to follow a creative brief. Students may choose a field that has previously not been their specialty with consultation with the Head of School. Specializations could include 1st assistant directing, continuity/script supervision, 1st camera assistant, clapper/data wrangler, gaffer, grip, design support (set /prop sourcing and construction, costume, set dressing), producing and production management.

This unit provides students with the theoretical framework and analytical skills to engage with current issues within the international film industry. Students are encouraged to explore the economic and cultural influences on the film industries of a variety of countries and to understand the varying relationships between individual countries’ industry needs and creative output.

This second unit (Production VI) for the Major Screen Production provides the learning opportunity for students to follow through their creative and pragmatic vision of a project from postproduction to the marketing of both the screen product and their own professional career. Students will analyse and evaluate how their own emergent screen production practice aligns with industry practitioners that they admire in their chosen craft discipline. They will also identify what aspects of their creative process in creating this Major Screen project can be effectively marketed to promote the final screen production.

This unit supports students in a specialty support role on another student’s major screen production in Production V/Production VI. Students further develop skills pertaining to their particular chosen field of specialization and develop the ability to analyse their work in the context of another student’s vision. Students also focus some of their time on developing an understanding of the particular career opportunities and risks of their chosen specialty within Production V/Production VI. Students may choose a field that has previously not been their specialty with consultation with the Head of School. Specializations could include 1st assistant directing, continuity/script supervision, 1st camera assistant, clapper/data wrangler, gaffer, grip, design support (set /prop sourcing and construction, costume, set dressing), producing and production management.

This unit provides students with the opportunity to critically reflect on their own creative and business practices and to proactively engage in learning about and constructing their own small business to support their craft. Through a multidisciplinary lens, this unit investigates the mental, physical, financial, social and career management competencies required to build a sustainable career in the screen industries in Australia. This unit systematically integrates academic research, national arts policy and small business practices as it examines the place of creatives within the Australian context. In doing this it provides the foundations for students to engage in lifelong learning around their craft and aims to build a holistic framework of learning that supports students to engage in sustained creative employment. It is imperative that students not only engage with the lecture series and tutorials, but apply the concepts, activities and tools studied in class to their own creative practice and the building and/or refining of their own small business.

This unit opens the student’s awareness to structural tools used by industry specialists and script doctors that can be applied to their original and personal concepts. The unit will focus on vertical thinking methodologies to find dramatic structure to create engaging works. Students will learn how to map preexisting films with regard to genre conventions and character journeys. They will identify and display in their writing the difference between outer and inner journeys of characters. Greater attention is placed on character development, dialogue and script editing with the aim of producing a product for the candidate’s major thesis short film.

This unit is the second of two directing units and builds upon the skills introduced in SPBA131. Students are taken through the process of creating a vision and then develop the practical, analytical and theoretical skills required to communicate the vision with major creative personnel that directors are likely to encounter. Students develop the necessary skills to align their vision with the needs, communication styles and priorities of the performers, art department, cinematography department and post production department to attain the skills to be able to produce a cohesive screen product. Weekly lectures are paired with weekly director’s exercises in the development of a “Director’s Book” for an original screen production of their choosing.

In this unit, students will synthesise their knowledge of screen design through a practical exploration of the discipline. Students will gain deeper knowledge of the visual elements and theoretical base that support the production designer’s contribution to a screen project. Students will explore design theories and their application to the design of a screen project through the production design and costume design, and through previsualization tools, construction and filmic techniques.

This unit is the second of two cinematography units and builds upon the skills introduced in the first unit. Students progress through advanced technical knowledge of cinematography, giving special attention to exposure and saturation, as well as more complex, dynamic camera operation.  These practical skills are complemented by deeper critical reflection and analysis in the form of case studies of the previous and current work of master cinematographers.

This unit is the second of two editing units and builds upon the skills introduced in the first unit. Students progress through advanced technical knowledge and creative storytelling techniques in visual editing, including advanced application of software tools for special FX and colour grading.  These practical skills are complemented by deeper critical reflection and analysis in the form of case studies of the previous and current work of master editors.

This unit is the second of two sound postproduction units and builds upon the skills introduced in the first unit. Students progress through advanced technical knowledge and creative storytelling techniques in sound editing and mixing, including advanced application of ProTools software, ADR and Foley techniques. These practical skills are complemented by deeper critical reflection and analysis in the form of case studies of the previous and current work of master sound editors and mixers.

This unit builds upon the skills introduced in Production I and Introduction to Specialty Workshops, recognising that students may want to add production management to their skill set as they prepare to graduate. Students progress through advanced technical knowledge and application of production management software for script breakdown, scheduling and production budgeting. These practical skills are complemented by deeper critical reflection and analysis in the form of case studies of short and long form screen productions from film and TV.

This unit supports students in a specialty support role on another student’s major screen production in Production V/Production VI. Students further develop skills pertaining to a particular field of specialization. In this unit students also focus some of their time on conducting research into this specialist area, within Production V/Production VI, to establish a lifelong learning practice. Students may choose a field that has previously not been their specialty with consultation with the Head of School. Specializations could include 1st assistant directing, continuity/script supervision, 1st camera assistant, clapper/data wrangler, gaffer, grip, design support (set /prop sourcing and construction, costume, set dressing), producing and production management.

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No data provided as the Bachelor of Screen Production commences in February 2021.

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